If you want to increase the likelihood that your new employee will fit in well with their team, adapt to the role and it's responsibilities and remain loyal, it is important to make sure that you know how to get the best out of them from day one.

Recruiting a new member of staff is a challenging, lengthy and sometimes costly process. A lot of effort goes into writing job specifications, liaising with job agencies, sifting through CVs, interviewing candidates and finalising offers. Yet for some reason, the vast majority of companies seem to think that once they have got their new hire through the door, that's where the recruitment process stops.

This couldn't be further from the truth however. If you want to increase the likelihood that your new employee will fit in well with their team, adapt to the role and it's responsibilities, want to progress within the company and vitally, remain loyal, it is important to make sure that you know how to get the best out of them from day one.

Start the process before their start date

We've all been there and have become familiar with day one at a new job. Hoards of paperwork to read and sign, introductions to every single person in the company that we cannot possibly remember and then when that's all done and nobody is really sure what to do with us, every piece of company literature is plonked in front of us so we can learn all about the business.

As well as being incredibly overwhelmed with the sheer amount of information being bombarded our way, a standard first day like this can leave new staff with a negative view of the company and may even lead them to question whether or not they have made the right decision.

If possible, why not eliminate the whole first day stereotype and get your new recruit on board before their official start date? Invite them in for a couple of hours to get the paperwork out the way, introduce them to their team members and even take them out for lunch with one or two other colleagues to ease them in gently. As well as feeling much more valued, this will help a new recruit to feel confident and relaxed from day one which means that they're more likely to hit the ground running.

Start with engaging projects

Whilst every job has its fair share of mundane tasks, try to avoid passing them all on to your new recruit on day one. A lot of people will decide whether or not to stay in a company long-term based on their first couple of days so try to get them involved in projects they were actually hired to do right from the beginning. Showing that you value their contribution will inspire productivity and loyalty and will make even the mundane tasks more bearable in the grand scheme of things.

Help build relationships

The relationships that colleagues have with each other is a big determining factor on their happiness within a company and how long they will stay for. Being the new person when everybody else already knows each other is daunting so initiate a team lunch or meeting that will break the ice and help to form long-term relationships.

Although many companies aim to adopt the above strategies within the first few weeks of hiring a new recruit, busy schedules frequently take over and any good intentions get forgotten about. Ensure that you take time to make your new employee feel welcomed and valued however and you will sure enough reap the benefits sooner than you expected.

Conduct reviews

As the new person, it can be hard to initiate meetings and raise any concerns because nobody wants to be seen as being difficult. It is vital to understand exactly how a new employee is feeling though because they might be struggling with certain aspects of the job but are too afraid to say so. Once they have been with the company for a month or so, set aside time for a one-on-one meeting because this is a great opportunity for both parties to express how they're feeling.

Perhaps your new recruit would like more training, to be more involved with teamwork or they have settled in so well they may even already want more responsibility. Similarly, from an employer's point of view this is your chance to express any concerns, clarify expectations and offer praise for a job well done. Without this important review, any bad feelings could go from bad to worse - resulting in unhappy employees and dissatisfied employers.