According to a YouGov survey carried out at the end of 2017, three in five employees have experienced mental health issues in the last year as a direct result of their job. Here are five great ways you can improve your wellbeing at work.

According to a YouGov survey carried out at the end of 2017, three in five employees have experienced mental health issues in the last year as a direct result of their job.

If you’re one of the many people struggling with this, below are five great ways you can improve your wellbeing at work.

Adopt healthier habits in the office

Looking after your health while you’re at work is just as important as it is at home. Drink plenty of water throughout the day, take healthy lunches so you’re less likely to give in to sugary snacks and if you’re sat at a desk all day, get up and stretch your legs every once in a while.

A lot of people feel bad about taking a lunch break, especially if they’re busy. Aside from the fact that you’re perfectly entitled to take a break, this could be detrimental to your health. Going out for even half an hour allows you to get some fresh air and a bit of exercise and you’ll be far more productive in the afternoon if you’ve had a proper break.

Identify your triggers

If you’re aware that your job is taking a toll on your mental health, work out what’s triggering your stress or anxiety. Doing this can help you to anticipate problems and come up with ways to prevent and solve them.

Perhaps certain tasks are making you feel anxious or maybe it’s one-off events such as presentations or regular issues like attending client meetings. Being bored at work because you don’t have enough to do can also cause just as much stress as having too much to do so if you sit around with nothing to do all day, speak to your manager about giving you more tasks.

Make more of an effort with your colleagues

Getting on well with your colleagues can make a huge difference to your happiness at work. If you tend to keep to yourself, try to make more of an effort. Getting involved can really help to improve your mood and the relationships you have in the office. If you refuse to get involved, you’ll end up with an awkward working environment and it could even get in the way of you being offered a promotion.

Manage your hours

Working 60 hours a week isn’t necessarily going to make you more productive than someone who works their contracted hours. If every hour you’re working you’re stressed and tired, the quality of your work is likely to decline. Being well-rested on the other hand means you’re far more likely to enjoy your job and remain productive.

If it’s your commute that’s making your day unmanageably long, speak to your manager about flexible working. Most companies these days are happy to allow employees to work from home one or two days a week.

Learn how to switch off

Technology has made it impossible for most of us to switch off, even when we’re not in the office. If you’re constantly worrying about replying to emails or taking phone calls outside of normal office hours, this will take a big toll on your mental health.   

Lead consultant at Bamboo Mental Health, Tom Oxley advises:

“When you leave work, actually leave work. This means turning off your work phone. Like a laptop, we need to stitch ourselves off and recharge.”

If your workload is regularly spilling into your personal life, talk to your manager about this. Together you should be able to come up with a solution such as delegating some of your tasks to other members of the team.

For some more great ways to improve your mental health both at home and in the workplace, the NHS provides more information about this.